Abortion

Methods of Abortion:


RU-48 (Mifepristone and Misoprostpol): Approximately 4 to 7 weeks after the start of their LMP (Last Menstrual Period)

This drug, sometimes referred to as the abortion pill, is only approved for women up to the 49th day after the start of their last menstrual period. The procedure usually requires three office visits. On the first visit, the woman is given pills to cause the death of the embryo. Two days later, if the abortion has not occurred, she is given a second drug which causes cramps to expel the embryo. The last visit is to determine if the procedure has been completed.

The abortion pill will not work in the case of an ectopic pregnancy. An ectopic pregnancy is a potentially life-threatening condition in which the embryo lodges outside of the uterus, usually in the fallopian tube. If not diagnosed early, the tube may burst, causing internal bleeding and in some cases, the death of the woman.

Women are being instructed to use the abortion pills in a manner not approved by the FDA. This includes using it beyond 49 days of pregnancy and using it vaginally. 

Manual Vacuum Aspiration: Approximately 7 weeks after LMP

This surgical abortion is done early in the pregnancy, up until 7 weeks after the woman’s last menstrual period. A long, thin tube is inserted into the uterus. A large syringe is attached to the tube and the embryo is suctioned out.

Suction Curettage: Approximately 6 to 14 weeks after UMP

This is the most common surgical abortion procedure. Because the fetus is larger, the doctor must first stretch open the cervix using metal rods. Opening the cervix may be painful, so local or general anesthesia is typically needed. After the cervix is stretched open, the doctor inserts a hard plastic tube into the uterus, and then connects this tube to a suction machine. The suction pulls the fetus’ body apart and out of the uterus. The doctor may also use a loop-shaped knife called a curette to scrape the fetus and fetal parts out of the uterus. (The doctor may refer to the fetus and fetal parts as the “products of conception.”)

Dilation and Evacuation (D&E): Approximately 13 to 24 weeks after LMP

This surgical abortion is done during the second trimester of pregnancy. At this point in the pregnancy, the fetus is too large to be broken up by suction alone and will not pass through the suction tubing. In this procedure, the cervix must be opened wider than in a first trimester abortion. This is done by inserting numerous thin rods of laminaria (Similar to  seaweed ) a day or two before the abortion. Laminaria expand by absorbing moisture and thereby dilate the cervix. Once the cervix is stretched open, the doctor pulls out the fetal parts with forceps. The fetus’ skull is crushed to ease removal. A sharp tool (called a curette) is also used to scrape out the contents of the uterus, removing any remaining tissue.

Late Term Abortions: Approximately 20 weeks after LMP to full-term

These procedures typically take place over three days, use local anesthesia, and are associated with increased risk to the life and health of the mother. On the first day, under ultrasound guidance, the fetal heart is injected with a medication that stops the heart and causes the fetus to die. Also over the first two days, the cervix is gradually stretched open using laminaria. On the third day, the amniotic sac is punctured and drained. The remainder of the procedure is similar to the D&E procedure described earlier. An alternative procedure involves inducing labor.